Created by volunteers, for volunteers
Focused on animals, wildlife and conservation


Marine Conservation


Ecuador's uniquely diverse coastline makes it a favourable nesting area for sea turtles, and as a result, there are 4 different species of turtles that call it home. These are green turtles, leatherbacks, hawksbills and olive-ridleys.

Despite their beauty and ecological importance, these gentle creatures are critically endangered.  Their nesting sites are being destroyed and over-fishing is depleting the oceans of food that is imperative for their survival.

The project was created in light of the urgent need to obtain information to conserve Ecuador’s ecosystems and marine resources, in particular, sea turtles. 

In addition to turtle conservation, project staff and volunteers work with the community educating people from the surrounding areas about the conservation projects and the importance of respecting the environment.

The project also operates a sea turtle egg hatchery program on one of the islands, the only one of its kind in Ecuador.

Minimum 1 month
From $1300 AUD

The collection of biological data is extremely important to this organisation in light of the urgent need to obtain information to conserve Ecuador’s ecosystems and marine resources, in particular, sea turtles. 

Until very recently it was believed that Hawksbill turtles only nested in the coasts of Central America. However, in 2008 this organisation found that this critically endangered species also nests in the beaches of Ecuador’s Coastline. Since then, with the aid of volunteers, research has been undertaken to learn more about this enigmatic creature and its presence in Ecuador. Other turtles that can be found in the area are green turtles, leatherbacks, hawksbills and olive-ridley turtles.

Despite their beauty and ecological importance, these gentle creatures are critically endangered.  Their nesting sites are being destroyed and over-fishing is depleting the oceans of food that is imperative for their survival.

Minimum 1 month
From $1300 AUD

There is no better place to Learn to Dive than Australia's Great Barrier Reef. Combine this with some marine conservation activities and it’s a match made in heaven.
 
Oceans 2 Earth Volunteers has teamed up with prominent scuba diving and outer reef operators in Cairns to offer volunteers a Marine Conservation program conducted on the Great Barrier Reef. With a high commitment to environmental protection and sustainability, this unique dive program falls under the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority’s (GBRMPA) powerful monitoring program ‘Eye on the Reef’ and is designed for volunteers interested in scuba diving, marine conservation and spending time on the reef.
 
The adventure begins in Cairns, the gateway to the Great Barrier Reef, where you will become a certified scuba diver by completing the popular 5 Day PADI Open Water Course (Advanced Courses or Nitrox available for participants already certified). Then volunteers embark upon the reef as certified divers and volunteer marine conservationists where they will join the ‘Eye on the Reef’ program and complete 8-10 underwater Rapid Monitoring surveys monitoring coral health. The information gathered provides managers and researchers of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA) with up-to-date information on reef health status and trends, the distribution of protected and iconic species, and early warnings of environmental impacts.
 
Volunteers will also have the unique opportunity to spend 4 days with a reef expert on the Great Barrier Reef, to learn and experience firsthand, this endangered natural wonder, the Great Barrier Reef.
 
Volunteers will undertake a minimum of 17 dives for the duration of the project.

Certified divers start Day 6 and complete a 7 day, 6 night program.

12 days, 10 nights (7 days, 6 nights for Certified Divers)
$2700 ($1900 for certified divers)

The Rehabilitation Centre treats injured and sick marine turtles brought in from the Great Barrier Reef and Cape York Peninsula. Animals are brought in suffering from disease, starvation and/or injuries caused by boats, discarded fishing gear or ingested plastic that is mistaken for food. Many of the turtles brought in from the Great Barrier Reef are suffering from 'floaters disease'.

Volunteers and donations from local businesses have kept the centre running. More than 170 sick and injured animals have been brought in for treatment over the past 10 years. Founded in 2000, the centre receives no funding from Government as the rehabilitation of sick and injured animals does not currently come under any conservation or environmental initiative.

Species of turtles in care at the centre include Green, Hawksbill and Olive Ridley turtles.

Minimum 1 week
From $770 AUD


Volunteers work within anon-governmental organisation committed to promoting the conservation and sustainable utilisation of marine resources through research, education and outreach enterprises.

This organisation has become recognised for its inclusive and holistic approach to conservation and ecosystem based research and focuses on a variety of initiatives, including an understanding the biology & ecology of sharks, skates & rays for management purposes, cetacean research focusing on southern right whales and the spatio-temporal behaviour of whales & dolphins in the local area, research techniques include photo identification, behavioural coding and environmental monitoring,  the collection of baseline diversity & abundance data from the Bay, a marine debris study and the investigation of the ecological role of mesopredators (medium sized predators including rays, snakes and sharks) in kelp forest ecosystems.

 

Minimum 2 weeks
From $1080 AUD