Created by volunteers, for volunteers
Focused on animals, wildlife and conservation


Habitat Conservation


Ecuador's uniquely diverse coastline makes it a favourable nesting area for sea turtles, and as a result, there are 4 different species of turtles that call it home. These are green turtles, leatherbacks, hawksbills and olive-ridleys.

Despite their beauty and ecological importance, these gentle creatures are critically endangered.  Their nesting sites are being destroyed and over-fishing is depleting the oceans of food that is imperative for their survival.

The project was created in light of the urgent need to obtain information to conserve Ecuador’s ecosystems and marine resources, in particular, sea turtles. 

In addition to turtle conservation, project staff and volunteers work with the community educating people from the surrounding areas about the conservation projects and the importance of respecting the environment.

The project also operates a sea turtle egg hatchery program on one of the islands, the only one of its kind in Ecuador.

Minimum 1 month
From $1300 AUD

The collection of biological data is extremely important to this organisation in light of the urgent need to obtain information to conserve Ecuador’s ecosystems and marine resources, in particular, sea turtles. 

Until very recently it was believed that Hawksbill turtles only nested in the coasts of Central America. However, in 2008 this organisation found that this critically endangered species also nests in the beaches of Ecuador’s Coastline. Since then, with the aid of volunteers, research has been undertaken to learn more about this enigmatic creature and its presence in Ecuador. Other turtles that can be found in the area are green turtles, leatherbacks, hawksbills and olive-ridley turtles.

Despite their beauty and ecological importance, these gentle creatures are critically endangered.  Their nesting sites are being destroyed and over-fishing is depleting the oceans of food that is imperative for their survival.

Minimum 1 month
From $1300 AUD

The Rehabilitation Centre treats injured and sick marine turtles brought in from the Great Barrier Reef and Cape York Peninsula. Animals are brought in suffering from disease, starvation and/or injuries caused by boats, discarded fishing gear or ingested plastic that is mistaken for food. Many of the turtles brought in from the Great Barrier Reef are suffering from 'floaters disease'.

Volunteers and donations from local businesses have kept the centre running. More than 170 sick and injured animals have been brought in for treatment over the past 10 years. Founded in 2000, the centre receives no funding from Government as the rehabilitation of sick and injured animals does not currently come under any conservation or environmental initiative.

Species of turtles in care at the centre include Green, Hawksbill and Olive Ridley turtles.

Minimum 1 week
From $770 AUD

Mwaluganje Elephant Sanctuary is a conservation area for elephants. It was introduced to create a wildlife corridor for the movement of elephants between Mwaluganje Forest Reserve to the north and Shimba Hills National Reserve to the south. Measuring 60,000 acres, elephants use this migratory passageway to access important foliage areas within their natural domain at different times of the year.

The Sanctuary was created to reduce human-elephant conflict arising from the large population of both humans and elephants in the area and to generate benefits for community members through wildlife and habitat conservation. 

The Sanctuary’s objectives are: -

  • To reduce human-elephant conflict within the area.
  • To conserve and protect wildlife.
  • To ensure that communities and individuals who owned land within the Mwaluganje-Shimba Hills National Reserve corridor could benefit from wildlife conservation and Eco-Tourism development.

The volunteer can choose to undertake a program of their choice based on their area of interest.

For more information on Mwaluganje Elephant Sanctuary, visit the MES website www.elesanctuary.org


Included is a 2 night safari to either the Massai Mara National Reserve in a tented camp or the Tsavo National Park in a lodge. You will go on 2 game drives each day and get up close to soe of Africa's most stunning wildlife.

You will also visit the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust Orphan's project where you will see the baby elephant's morning feed and mud/dust bath.  If you adopt an elephant, you can return that evening for the orphan's bedtime where you can chat to the keepers and get to know your adopted elephant.

Minimum 4 weeks
From $1700 AUD


This project, operated by local carers, operates a licensed rescue, rehabilitation and release program for Australian wildlife, mainly kangaroos, wallabies, possums and sugar gliders.
 
Predominantly, animals are given to the project by the largest animal welfare organisation in Australian, the RSPCA (Royal Society of the Protection of Animals) where they are rehabilitated and released into South D’Aguilar National Park via a number of broad bush corridorslocated at the rear of the property. The National Park encompasses Lake Manchester and Gold Creek Reservoir.   
 
The project cares for around 40 animals at a time and animals arereleased when they are healthy and able to survive in the wild.
 
The project is also heavily involved in reforestation programs on their own and surrounding properties.

Minimum 1 week
From $660 AUD

This project provides volunteers with a unique opportunity to participate in ethical wildlife research, studying African wildlife free-roaming in their natural environment.
 
You will learn to navigate and track animals through the South African bush while undertaking vital conservation research into some of South Africa’s most iconic animal species. The project has a strong focus on safe-guarding the wellbeing of the animals and their environment and employs non-invasive methods of data collection.
 
The structure of the project helps to maximise learning for volunteers, combining four days of field work each week with one day of theoretical learning in the form of lectures or workshops.  The first two weeks focus on wildlife training where volunteers learn dangerous game approach methods, wildlife tracks and signs, useful botany, navigation and survival skills, animal behaviour and warning signs. You will then spend the remainder of your time participating in scientific research in the field. Research activities have a conservation focus and aim to improve the welfare of wildlife in South Africa and ensure the long-term sustainability of wildlife reserves.

Minimum 2 weeks (4 weeks recommended)
From $1890 AUD