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Created by volunteers, for volunteers Focused on animals, wildlife and conservation
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Animal Rescue


This project is an animal rescue and rehabilitation centre in the Amazon jungle working in partnership with the indigenous Quichuan community. It provides a unique opportunity to actively work in an animal care and rehabilitation program that operates in collaboration with the Environmental Police (UPMA) and the Ministry of Environment.

The centre’s main goal is to rescue wild animals from unhealthy and illegal situations that have been the victims of animal-trafficking or mistreatment and enrich their existence as best they can in captivity.

Open since 2006, the project operates on over 60 private hectares of primary Amazon forest where some of the animals live in excellent enclosures or on islands. Other animals have behavioural enrichment while they are in rehabilitation and can be released into a National Park or an area suitable for their species. The most commonly trafficked groups of animals are primates, birds and reptiles.

Minimum 2 weeks
From $1200 AUD

Every year, hundreds of thousands of native animals are injured, orphaned or become sick, often because of interaction with people or pets.

This wildlife shelter in country Australia is one of the largest unsupported privately owned wildlife shelters in Australia and for more than 30 years, it has rescued and rehabilitated sick, injured and orphaned native Australian wildlife and loved them back to health to be returned to the natural environment.

Since it receives no recurrent funding from governments, the shelter relies on the contribution of volunteers and donations from the public to keep it running.

Minimum 2 weeks
From $1210 AUD


The Endangered Species Conservation facility manages a number of captive breeding programs and partners with Government authorities, universities and zoological institutions to conduct vital research on Australian wildlife. The facility focuses on threatened species, particularly the Bridled Nailtail Wallaby and Northern and Southern Hairy-nosed Wombats. The facility is the only captive breeding facility for Bridled Nailtail Wallabies in the world.
 
The centre also provides medical care for injured, sick and orphaned wildlife through its rescue and rehabilitation program. Animals are nursed back to health with the goal of being well enough to be released back into the wild. The facility also supports other wildlife carers who assist with this dedicated work.
 
The centre delivers a range of wildlife education programs to enable local community groups, industry bodies, school groups and individuals to be actively involved in the conservation of native animals. The programs highlight the importance of maintaining a healthy natural environment to ensure the well-being of our native species.
 
The facility welcomes students and volunteers from all over the world to learn about Australian wildlife and contribute to the breeding, research and education programs.

2-6 weeks (longer by negotiation)
From $1210 AUD

The Rehabilitation Centre treats injured and sick marine turtles brought in from the Great Barrier Reef and Cape York Peninsula. Animals are brought in suffering from disease, starvation and/or injuries caused by boats, discarded fishing gear or ingested plastic that is mistaken for food. Many of the turtles brought in from the Great Barrier Reef are suffering from 'floaters disease'.

Volunteers and donations from local businesses have kept the centre running. More than 170 sick and injured animals have been brought in for treatment over the past 10 years. Founded in 2000, the centre receives no funding from Government as the rehabilitation of sick and injured animals does not currently come under any conservation or environmental initiative.

Species of turtles in care at the centre include Green, Hawksbill and Olive Ridley turtles.

Minimum 1 week
From $770 AUD

A non-profit organisation with a no kill policy, the rescue centre is dedicated to reducing the cat population in Playa del Carmen. They achieve this via the TNR (trap spay/neuter and return) program for feral cats and the rescue, treat, spay/neuter and tame program for kittens under 3 months. The centre aims to find a permanent loving home for all rescued kittens in their care.

The centre is also committed to education, which encourages responsible pet ownership and challenges negative associations with feral cats and consequent cruelty.

While the rescue centre’s primary focus is cats, the clinic also provides spay/neuter services for dogs.

Minimum 2 weeks
From $900 AUD

The centre works for the conservation of bats and their habitat as poor public attitudes towards flying foxes and habitat loss are the root causes of many problems facing bat conservation.

They achieve this by:

• rescuing, rehabilitating and releasing hundreds of bats every year
• providing a lifetime sanctuary for bats that are too severely injured to return to the wild or have been retired from zoos
• educating the public about bats through schools and the onsite Visitor Centre
• habitat restoration work at 2 bat colonies
• facilitating research into flying foxes by various universities and government bodies
• advocating for bats.

All four species of Australian flying foxes are in permanent care as well as tube-nosed bats and microbats. A visitor’s centre was opened in 2009 to provide educational programs for a broader community of local residents, students and tourists.  

1 week to 1 month. Longer stays of up to 3 months are on request after a 1 month stay.
From $635 AUD

This project was started in 2005 when it became apparent that dog and cat populations were spiralling out of control and cruelty to these animals was prevalent.

One factor was that after the Tsunami during the Thai construction boom, construction workers came to the island with their dogs but left them behind when the buildings were completed. The number of tourists visiting the island and feeding these dogs increased which resulted in their high survival and reproduction rates causing over population.

The centre’s primary objectives are to control the population of stray animals on Koh Lanta Yai in a humane way through sterilization programs and to provide medical attention to sick and injured animals.

The centre also aims to promote awareness and educate the local community on the importance of animal care and respect to local dog and cat populations.  This assists in helping to reduce the local issues of abuse and over population.

BONUS: Book 4 weeks, stay a month, book 8 weeks, stay 2 months, book 12 weeks, stay 3 months.

 

4 weeks - 12 weeks
From $640 AUD


This project, operated by local carers, operates a licensed rescue, rehabilitation and release program for Australian wildlife, mainly kangaroos, wallabies, possums and sugar gliders.
 
Predominantly, animals are given to the project by the largest animal welfare organisation in Australian, the RSPCA (Royal Society of the Protection of Animals) where they are rehabilitated and released into South D’Aguilar National Park via a number of broad bush corridorslocated at the rear of the property. The National Park encompasses Lake Manchester and Gold Creek Reservoir.   
 
The project cares for around 40 animals at a time and animals arereleased when they are healthy and able to survive in the wild.
 
The project is also heavily involved in reforestation programs on their own and surrounding properties.

Minimum 1 week
From $660 AUD